Switzerland is known for its luxury goods: expensive watches, fine chocolate, exquisite cheese. But eMTBs? Thömus is not an unknown brand among the Swiss, but outside of the country, you’ll hardly ever see a Thömus Lightrider E1.

For more information on the group test head to: The best eMTB you can buy

Thömus Lightrider E1 | 21.21 kg | 10,290 CHF (approx. € 9,000)

The Thömus Lightrider E1 is based on a carbon frame with 150 mm of travel, rolling on 27.5″ wheels with 2.8″ wide tires and powered by a Shimano STEPS E8000 motor with an integrated 500 Wh battery. That chassis can be freely customised with a configurator to suit your own preferences and budget! The high-end spec of our test bike costs 10,290 CHF (about € 9,000).

The Thömus is as precise as a Swiss clockwork

For this, you get FOX factory suspension, an electronic Shimano XT Di2 drivetrain and XT four-piston brakes. The biggest expense are the DT Swiss HXC carbon wheels. With the integration of the battery, you’ll be able to mount a bottle cage on the oversized down tube, but a real highlight is Thömus’ Total Integration Concept (TIC) for the cockpit. The cables are fed into the frame via the stem, which gives the bike a very clean, tidy look.

Thömus Lightrider E1 in Detail

Fork FOX 36 Factory 150 mm
Rear shock FOX FLOAT X2 Factory 150 mm
Motor/Battery Shimano STEPS E8000/integriert 700 Wh
Drivetrain Shimano XT Di2 11-speed
Brakes Shimano XT 4 piston 200/180 mm
Seat post Kind Shock LEV INTEGRA 160 mm
Stem Thömus Total Integration Concept 60 mm
Handlebar Thömus alloy 770 mm
Wheels DT Swiss HXC 1200 SPLINE
Tires Maxxis High Roller II 27.5×2.8″

Full carbon
The entire frame of the Lightrider E1 is constructed of carbon fibre. Together with the high-end spec, this keeps the weight down to 21.21 kg.
Impractical
The start button of the Shimano motor is tiny and it’s placed on the down tube where it gets bombarded with dirt.
Complex
The setup of the FOX FLOAT X2 can be quite confusing. We recommend riding with the compression as far open (minus) as possible. That way the suspension is more sensitive, offering more comfort and traction.
Super clean
Thanks to the TIC stem, the routing of the cables on the Lightrider E1 is super clean – a rarity on an eMTB.

Geometry of the Thömus Lightrider E1

Size S M L
Seat tube 410 mm 450 mm 490 mm
Oberrohr 567 mm 599 mm 635 mm
Head tube 110 mm 120 mm 130 mm
Head angle 66.9° 66.9° 66.9°
Seat angle 75.6° 75.6° 75.6°
Chainstay 440 mm 440 mm 440 mm
BB Drop 13 mm 13 mm 13 mm
Wheelsbase 1123 mm 1156 mm 1190 mm
Reach 420 mm 447 mm 479 mm
Stack 576 mm 585 mm 594 mm

Thömus Lightrider E1 in Review

Helmet iXS TRIGGER AM | Jersey GORE C5 All Mountain 3/4 Trikot | Shorts GORE C5 All Mountain Shorts | Backpack CamelBak K.U.D.U. Trans Alp

As understated as the Lightrider E1 looks, so composed is its handling. The seating position is nicely balanced, neither too aggressive nor too upright. Due to the low front end, the front wheel stays weighted when climbing, keeping it firmly on the ground up steep inclines, and so, the Thömus is able to master technical climbs with ease. In Trail mode, the Shimano Motor is easy to modulate and, if you want to, you can customise the support levels with Shimano’s E-TUBE PROJECT app. The handling of the Lightrider when descending is composed and intuitive.

Tuning tip: Mount a handlebar with more rise and swap carbon wheels for a cheaper aluminium alternative

The bike makes direction changes willingly, making it easy for less experienced riders to navigate tight sections. The carbon wheels are very stiff and lend the bike razor-sharp and precise handling. The suspension provides sufficient levels of comfort, good traction and a lot of feedback. It underlines the very direct character of the bike. On really demanding descents, the Lightrider always remains controllable, but it will let the rider know when it’s time to get on the brakes. The low front end pulls you forward on steep descents, making it difficult to sit back and let the bike do the work. A handlebar with more rise could help here.


Riding Characteristics

5

Agility

  1. sluggish
  2. playful

Stability

  1. nervous
  2. stable

Handling

  1. unbalanced
  2. balanced

Riding fun

  1. boring
  2. lively

Motor feeling

  1. digital
  2. natural

Motor power

  1. weak
  2. strong

Value for money

  1. poor
  2. top

Technical Data

Thömus
Lightrider E1

Size: S M L
Weight: 21.21 kg
Perm. total weight: 130 kg
Max. payload (rider/equipment): 108 kg
Motor torque: 70 Nm
Battery Capacity: 504 Wh
Travel (f/r): 150/150 mm
Wheel Size: 27.5"
Price: € 9,000

Rider type

Beginner 1
Touring Rider 2
Trail rider 3
Extreme rider 4

Conclusion

The Thömus Lightrider E1 is a bike for individualists. It is one of the few eMTBs on the market that you can freely configure according to your own desires. Our test bike convinced us with its balanced and composed handling, as well as its high-quality workmanship.

Tops

  • agile and direct handling
  • always stays predictable
  • configurator offers maximum customisation
  • TIC stem gives the bike a super clean look

Flops

  • low front pulls the rider forward on steep descents
  • carbon wheels are very stiff and uncomfortable

For more information head to: thoemus.ch

For more information on the group test head to: The best eMTB you can buy

All Bikes in Test

Canyon Spectral:ON 9.0 | Focus JAM² 9.8 DRIFTERGHOST HYBRIDE SL AMR X S 7.7+ LCGiant Trance E+ 0 Pro | Haibike XDURO AllMtn 8.0 FLYON | Husqvarna HC 9.0 | Intense TazerLapierre eZesty AM LTD Ultimate | MERIDA eONE-SIXTY 900E | Mondraker Level RRScott Genius eRIDE 900 TUNED | Specialized S-Works Turbo Levo FSRThömus Lightrider E1 | Trek Powerfly LT 9.9


This article is from E-MOUNTAINBIKE issue #016

E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine is published in a digital app format in both English and German. Download the app for iOS or Android to read all articles on your tablet or smartphone. 100% free!

Words: Christoph Bayer Photos: Trev Worsey

About the author

Christoph Bayer

Christoph loves to be kept on his toes – both on the bike and in his role for the E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine. He’s known as the guy in charge of the magazine and masquerades as both its editor and photographer. You’ll usually find him tearing up the mountains on his bike, soaking up the flow or tackling technical, narrow trails.